【Andrew Dickeson - Weaver Of Dreams】(2011) ★★★★☆


(English follows the Japanese)

 

By Takaaki Kondo, Tokyo Jazz Review


Andrew Dickesonさんは1969AustraliaNewcastle出身のDrummer, ArrangerSydneyNew South Wales Conservatorium of Musicで学び若くしてAustraliaのジャズシーンで"first-call drummer"となる。1991年にNew Yorkに移りArt TaylorVernel Fournierに師事する一方、Johnny Griffin, Junior Cook, Lee Konitz, Kirk Lightsey, Mark Murphy等大物のバンドで活躍。1992年にはThelonious Monk Institute International Jazz Drums Competitionで唯一のアメリカ人以外のフィナリストとなる(この時の審査員はRoy Haynes, Jack DeJohnette, Alan Dawson, Ed Shaughnessy, Jeff "Tain" WattsDave Weckl

さて、彼のリーダーアルバムである本作品ですが

『いかにもDrumsがリーダーのアルバム臭』

がしません、勿論良い意味で。アンサンブルを非常に大事にしています。リーダーのAndrewさん自身のアレンジも冴え渡っています

そして選曲が良い!趣味が良い!とにかく良い!(笑)
最近あまり聴くことができない5060年代の名曲を取り上げて趣味良く料理しています。と言っても「(アレンジを)書きすぎる」ことなく、演奏はごく自然にStraight Aheadで爽やかで好感が持てます 

 

特にDexter Gordon”A Swingin' Affair”(1962)に収録されている”Soy Califa”は中学生の頃から何百回も聴いている大好きな曲なのに(冒頭、Dexの「Soy Caliiiiiiiiiiiifa!」の雄叫びから始まるのが何とも楽しい)、あまり他のMusicianが取り上げないのが「何で?」だったのですが、流石にAndrew博士※、ちゃんと入れてきてくれて嬉しい限りです

 

※彼は古今東西、(Drumsだけでなく)様々な楽器のMusician、アルバムに驚くほど精通しています。なので私は「Dr. Andrew」と呼んでいます(笑)

 

Duke Ellington OrchestraJonny HodgesFeature曲として有名な Isfahanも嬉しいですね


Andrew
の、決して「オレがオレが!」にならない趣味の良いDrummingに乗って各ソロイストが気持よく演奏しています。何気なく難しいことをやってたりするのが憎いね!特にTenor SaxRoger Maninsという人はかなりの実力者ですね。もちろんAndrewImaginativeSoloは素晴らしい!

サイコーです!

Excellent!


 

(Personnel)
Andrew Dickeson - drums, arrangements

Roger Manins - tenor saxophone

Eamon McNelis - trumpet

Steve Barry - piano

Alex Boneham - bass

(Track List) 

1Ill Wind (Arlen/Koehler)

2Isfahan (Ellington/Strayhorn)

3Soy Califa (Gordon)

4Darn that Dream (Van Heusen/DeLange)

5A Weaver of Dreams (Young/Elliot)

6Big Foot (Parker)

7Herzog (Hutcherson)

8Relaxin at Camarillo (Parker)

Andrew Dickeson - Website

Offcial Website

http://www.andrewdickeson.com/index.html


Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/andrew.dickeson.54?fref=ts

Preview

http://www.andrewdickeson.com/cds.html

Buy CD

http://www.andrewdickeson.com/cds.html

http://www.hmv.co.jp/artist_Andrew-Dickeson_000000000465480/item_Weaver-Of-Dreams_4213555

 

Related Video

A Weaver of Dreams

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XjTJUZURXWA

A Weaver Of Dreams - Andrew Dickeson's "Swingmatism"
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KBpbT_KSH-s

Andrew Dickeson's Swingmatism perform "Rhythm-a-ning"
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lgqKOQR7VG8

Review

With WEAVER OF DREAMS, his exciting debut CD, on Rufus Records, drummer Andrew Dickeson has elevated himself beyond his universally accepted perch as a stellar sideman and is now staking his claim as a distinguished bandleader. As a stalwart of the Australian jazz scene, and sideman to such international greats as Johnny Griffin, Junior Cook, Lee Konitz, Kirk Lightsey, Mark Murphy and many more, he has learned much of the art of being a leader, the essence of which, in his opinion, "is to communicate to the band the concept, sound and feeling you want, while encouraging the freedom to express themselves."

He continues: "As my playing evolved over many years as a sideman, a role I still love and enjoy, I knew that it was time to make a musical statement of my own and to present music with my fingerprint on it. I could hear this band in my mind long before it was formed, and I felt that it would be something special. My concept was to have a band that was creative, polished and swingin, in which each tune would be a musical journey, for us and listeners. I chose musicians who could create the sound and feeling I aimed for, and theyve responded beautifully. "Roger Manins and I go back many years, and weve had considerable experience, both here and abroad. Eamon McNelis, Alex Boneham and Steve Barry are rising stars who play with strength, personality and maturity far beyond their years. The combination is a formidable one -- full of excitement and energy. "The repertoire on this CD, recorded live at The Sound Lounge in Sydney, at a concert for SIMA, is a good indication of the bands direction. Its energetic, exciting and, just as importantly, entertaining. My aim is always to include the listener in our experience through SWING the universal rhythmic feeling that allows people to share the joy of life through music. On Weaver of Dreams youll hear a blend of classics from the Great American Songbook, which I have reworked and personalised, some less frequently performed tunes by Charlie Parker, Dexter Gordon and Bobby Hutcherson, presenting exciting melodic, harmonic and rhythmic challenges, and two beautifully poignant ballads. To fully display the talents of this ensemble, Ive chosed to feature different combinations: quintet, quartet, duet and solo drum kit." To finish, in the words of another very fine drummer, George Coleman Jr, "Dickeson, like his mentors and heroes, ensures that his music comes from the heart and is ALWAYS swinging hard!"

 

Australian drummer Andrew Dickeson makes a strong recording debut as leader with a well-chosen selection of standards. Dickeson has been a sideman for over 25 years, having begun his professional career when he was 13. Born into a musical family, he began playing the drums when he was 10. He moved briefly to New York in 1991 where he studied with Art Taylor and Vernel Fournier and was a finalist in the 1992 Thelonious Monk Institute International Jazz Drums Competition. After returning to Australia , Dickenson graced the rhythm chair for a host of musicians including Lee Konitz, Martin Taylor, Annie Ross and Warren Vaché. After all of his experiences, he felt that the time was right for this recording. With the concept firmly etched, he formed his band and set out on his journey. Interpreting standards could well lead to comparisons, but they can stand on their own and provide a fresh perspective as the music on this CD does. The band is strong and evokes images that capture the imagination. Dickeson sets the pulse for "Ill Wind" which blows a lot of good. The arrangement ushers in tonal shifts, the floating head settling down and then gradually heating up through the tenor saxophone solo of Roger Manins. He has a fluid sense of expression bringing in swing and tensile notes that bend ever so deliciously in a fermenting pool of ideas. Trumpeter Eamon McNelis's phrasing is taut and driving and while he gives the tune another edge, pianist Steve Barry moves back into swing mode, with a light flexing touch. Dickeson articulates the rhythm, as he commands the dynamics and keeps the groove pliant in tandem with the beat steady bassist Alex Boneham. Billy Strayhorn's " Isfahan " is made all the more consummate by McNelis. His tone is beautiful as it delves into the soul of the tune and makes it glow with the warmth of his approach, letting the notes seep and linger or elongating then with unbridled passion. Barry is the other wing, lending an accomplished presence with his winsome playing. Dickeson and Boneham grab hold of Charlie Parker's "Big Foot" and turn it into a happy interaction. Drums and bass engage in conversation, a little call and response, before they go out on the lope together. It's downright engaging fun. Parker's "Relaxin' at Camarillo" is a solo slot for Dickenson. Here is a drummer who knows how to make rhythm stand up and exult. The patterns he creates are bright and brisk with the traps and the cymbals singing in consonance. Dickeson weaves his dreams with flair and imagination turning this first record into a delight and the beacon for more.

By JERRY D'SOUZA, All About Jazz

 

http://www.rufusrecords.com.au/catalogue/RF097.html

With Weaver Of Dreams, his exciting debut CD, drummer Andrew Dickeson has elevated himself beyond his universally accepted perch as a stellar sideman and is now staking his claim as a distinguished bandleader. As a stalwart of the Australian jazz scene, and sideman to such international greats as Johnny Griffin, Junior Cook, Lee Konitz, Kirk Lightsey, Mark Murphy and many more, he has learned much of the art of being a leader, the essence of which, in his opinion, is to communicate to the band the concept, sound and feeling you want, while encouraging the freedom to express themselves.He continues: As my playing evolved over many years as a sideman, a role I still love and enjoy, I knew that it was time to make a musical statement of my own and to present music with my fingerprint on it. I could hear this band in my mind long before it was formed, and I felt that it would be something special. My concept was to have a band that was creative, polished and swingin, in which each tune would be a musical journey, for us and listeners. I chose musicians who could create the sound and feeling I aimed for, and theyve responded beautifully. Roger Manins and I go back many years, and weve had considerable experience, both here and abroad. Eamon McNelis, Alex Boneham and Steve Barry are rising stars who play with strength, personality and maturity far beyond their years. The combination is a formidable one -- full of excitement and energy. The repertoire on this CD, recorded at a Sydney Improvised Music Association (SIMA) performance at The Sound Lounge, is a good indication of the bands direction. Its energetic, exciting and, just as importantly, entertaining. My aim is always to include the listener in our experience through SWING the universal rhythmic feeling that allows people to share the joy of life through music. On Weaver of Dreams youll hear a blend of classics from the Great American Songbook, which I have reworked and personalised, some less frequently performed tunes by CharlieParker, Dexter Gordon and Bobby Hutcherson, presenting exciting melodic, harmonic and rhythmic challenges, and two beautifully poignant ballads. To fully display the talents of this ensemble, Ive chosen to feature different combinations: quintet, quartet, duet and solo drum kit. To finish, in the words of another very fine drummer, George Coleman Jr, Dickeson, like his mentors and heroes, ensures that his music comes from the heart and is ALWAYS swinging hard!

As previously stated word of mouth has made and in some cases  killed a business or a recording artist. The buzz around drummer/  educator/arranger Andrew Dickeson and his latest quintet release is  all good because it swings like a beast! 

Live recordings are sometimes a gamble. Live recordings that are  predominately standards played by the wrong musicians can be the  equivalent of tap dancing in a musical minefield. Dickeson pulls off  a sublime smoker with chops and with the sensitivity and finesse  certain tunes call for.

Dickeson is an incredibly respected "sideman" and this live  recording has literally been 25 years in the making and explodes  with the right lineup and stellar arrangements of some marvelous  tunes. "Soy Califa" is a Dexter Gordon classic and tenor player  Roger Manins shines here as does the rest of the ensemble as they  put their musical chops on display for all to see. Again Roger  Manins does some stunning work on "Darn That Dream" with the  quintet playing "with" Manins and not "around" him allowing for that  true working band feel of musical synergy to make this live effort  pop! Closing out the live set is "Relaxin' At Camarillo" which is a 3  minute and 56 second unaccompanied master class on how to  swing as a drummer.  

Weaver of Dreams contains a marvelous ebb and flow from gentle  flowing standards to hard charging swing further proving if the chain  is only as strong as its weakest link then there are no weak links  here! Australia is giving the United States some top flight jazz talent  from Laura Kahle to JC Styles and now Andrew Dickeson! A quintet  of great depth and innate feel for what real swing is all about - the  groove. Hopefully Weaver Of Dreams is only a taste of what is to  come!   

- Brent Black Digital Jazz News

 

Australian drummer Andrew Dickeson makes a strong recording debut as  leader with a well-chosen selection of standards. Dickeson has been a sideman  for over 25 years, having begun his professional career when he was 13. Born  into a musical family, he began playing the drums when he was 10. He moved  briefly to New York in 1991 where he studied with Art Taylor and Vernel  Fournier and was a finalist in the 1992 Thelonious Monk Institute International  Jazz Drums Competition. After returning to Australia, Dickenson graced the  rhythm chair for a host of musicians including Lee Konitz, Martin Taylor, Annie  Ross and Warren Vaché. After all of his experiences, he felt that the time was  right for this recording. With the concept firmly etched, he formed his band  and set out on his journey. Interpreting standards could well lead to comparisons, but they can stand on  their own and provide a fresh perspective as the music on this CD does. The  band is strong and evokes images that capture the imagination. Dickeson sets the pulse for Ill Wind which blows a lot of good. The  arrangement ushers in tonal shifts, the floating head settling down and then  gradually heating up through the tenor saxophone solo of Roger Manins. He  has a fluid sense of expression bringing in swing and tensile notes that bend  ever so deliciously in a fermenting pool of ideas. Trumpeter Eamon McNelis's  phrasing is taut and driving and while he gives the tune another edge, pianist  Steve Barry moves back into swing mode, with a light flexing touch. Dickeson  articulates the rhythm, as he commands the dynamics and keeps the groove  pliant in tandem with the beat steady bassist Alex Boneham. Billy Strayhorn's Isfahan is made all the more consummate by McNelis. His  tone is beautiful as it delves into the soul of the tune and makes it glow with  the warmth of his approach, letting the notes seep and linger or elongating  then with unbridled passion. Barry is the other wing, lending an accomplished  presence with his winsome playing. Dickeson and Boneham grab hold of Charlie Parker's Big Foot and turn it into  a happy interaction. Drums and bass engage in conversation, a little call and  response, before they go out on the lope together. It's downright engaging fun.  Parker's Relaxin' at Camarillo is a solo slot for Dickeson. Here is a drummer  who knows how to make rhythm stand up and exult. The patterns he creates  are bright and brisk with the traps and the cymbals singing in consonance.  Dickeson weaves his dreams with flair and imagination turning this first record  into a delight and the beacon for more.

-Jerry DSouza allaboutjazz.com  

 

A stalwart of the Australian Jazz scene, drummer Andrew Dickeson decides to step out on  his own after a 25-year career as a sideman to such legends as Mark Murphy, Lee Konitz,  Red Holloway, Junior Cook and Johnny Griffin among others. He does so with a superbly  crafted debut album entitled Weaver of Dreams, recorded live at The Sound Stage in  Sydney, Australia, as part of a concert for the Sydney Improvised Music Association  (SIMA). Dickeson leads an aspiring quintet of players with veteran tenor saxophonist  Roger Manins who joins trumpeter Eamon McNelis in fronting pianist Steve Barry and  bassist Alex Boneham all rising stars down under.

 

Borrowing from the Great American Songbook, the drummer includes sparkling  arrangements from giants of jazz like the one and only Charlie Parker, Dexter Gordon and  Billy Strayhorn among the mix. Written by Harold Arlen for the last show at the famed  Cotton Club Parade in 1934, Ill Wind starts the music rolling on the first swinging piece of  the album and the first of several lengthy tunes with this one clocking in at fourteen-  minutes plus. McNelis introduces and leads the music on Strayhorns ballad Isfahan, with  soft phrasings on the trumpet as the leader swishes the brushes on the first laid back tune  of the set. Playing a bit of Cuban descarga, the group gyrates to Dexter Gordons classic Soy Califa  with Dickesons strong percussive charge setting the beat on this one. Though the piece  begins in the Latin mode, it shifts to a more modern jazz number for most of its thirteen-  minute romp featuring a sizzling solo performance from the saxophonist. The band enters  calmly on the Van Heusen standard Darn That Dream with Manins strong tenor voice  leading the music once again on the other decidedly mellow tune of the set. Victor Youngs title song is perhaps the most ambitious number of the project clocking in at  over fifteen minutes in duration; this one is a Dickeson special arrangement as the leader  opens the tune on a three-minute drum solo followed by sprite solos from Manins and  McNelis respectively. Theres a playful duet between bassist Boneham and the drummer  on Parkers Big Foot, while Bobby Hutchersons lively Herzog provides pianist Barry a  moment to shine, as the live set closes with a last solo dicey drum rumble from Dickeson  on the finale piece Relaxin At Camarillo. Though clearly a drummers album, Andrew Dickesons Weaver of Dreams takes pages  from the Great American Songbook and reinvigorates old warn out classic with an infusion  on modern jazz jam that is both bold and entertaining. The cheers and applause from the  crowd at The Sound Stage, affirms that the music on this impressive debut, give jazz audiences  everywhere many moments of musical pleasure.

-Edward Blanco Ejazznews

 

Few groups making their recording debut have excited me as much as  this quintet led by Andrew Dickeson, whose drumming is a byword for  taste, class and swing. Standards and little played compositions by  Charlie Parker and Dexter Gordon are reworked with imagination, re  and excitement. Ill Wind is given an Art Blakey Jazz Messengers  makeover (a far cry from my favourite version by Ella Fitzgerald at the  Chicago Opera House in 1957) and Soy Califa, after irting with the feel  of a Cuban descargo, takes off crackling with unagging excitement.  Melbourne trumpeter Eamon McNelis is superb, especially on Isfahan,  his beautifully controlled horn sensitive with a singing quality. Tenorist  Roger Manins solos are full of ideas and pianist Steve Barry is another  uent and absorbing soloist. Bassist Alex Boneham meshes beautifully  with Dickerson who gives a master class of jazz drumming on Relaxin At  Camarillo. An exceptional album! 5 stars

-Kevin Jones Limelight

 

Sydney drummer, educator and bandleader Andrew Dickeson studied in  New York in the early nineties, appears on around fty albums, and has  played with the cream of jazz talent in Australian and internationally.  Recorded live at Sydneys SIMA Sound Lounge in April 2011, this  strongly swinging front line consists of tenor powerhouse Roger Manins,  who commutes between Auckland and Sydney, and Melbourne trumpeter  Eamon McNelis, who won the 2010 Wangaratta Jazz Festival National  Award. The eight tracks are all standards, but of a slightly unusual nature,  skilfully arranged by Dickeson. Harold Arlens Ill Wind is a fourteen  minute opener, where drums rhythmically emphasize the melody line  with the horns, ahead of two solo sets from all ve, rstly with Maninss  full-bodied, endlessly inventive tenor, superbly underwritten by pianist  Steve Barry and Alex Bonehams bass. Isfahan features solo trumpet with  the rhythm section and McNelis delivers a sensitive ballad interpretation,  climbing chromatically into the upper register then dropping down to  tenderly caress the lower notes before a languid piano excursion. The  title track opens with highly intelligent, crash-and-bang free drums  followed by outstanding solos from everyone. Manins plays a wonderful  breathy tribute to Coleman Hawkins on Darn That Dream and bass and  drums provide clever exchanges in Parkers Big Foot. For a live  recording this album quality is very good with no distracting audience  noises. 4 stars

-John McBeath The Australian

 

Here is a range of great reviews  from the USA and here in full, quite a response:

 

http://m.theaustralian.com.au/news/arts/weaver-of-dreams-andrew-dickeson-quintet/story-fn9sulvf-1226157818594

 

http://digitaljazznews.blogspot.com/2011/12/andrew-dickeson-quintet-weaver-of.html?m=1

 

http://www.allaboutjazz.com/php/article.php?id=40938

 

http://www.jazzandbeyond.com.au/cdreview.html#TheAndrewDickesonQuintetCD

 

http://www.jazzandbeyond.com.au/interview.html#AndrewDickeson

 

http://jasminecrittenden.suite101.com/interview-with-australian-jazz-drummer-andrew-dickeson-a398056

 

http://ejazznews.com/2011/12/13/the-andrew-dickeson-quintet-weaver-of-dreams/

 

Bio

Andrew Dickeson was born in Newcastle, Australia in 1969. He grew up in a musical family and studied a number of instruments before taking up the drums at age ten. He was working professionally from age 13 in both classical and jazz settings. He moved to Sydney in 1987 and studied at the New South Wales Conservatorium of Music. He quickly became one of the first-call drummers on the Sydney scene. In 1991 he went to New York and commenced his studies with Jazz masters Art Taylor and Vernel Fournier. He performed with a variety of musicians during his time in New York City. In 1992 he was the only non-American finalist in the prestigious Thelonious Monk Institute International Jazz Drums Competition - judged by Roy Haynes, Jack DeJohnette, Alan Dawson, Ed Shaughnessy, Jeff "Tain" Watts and Dave Weckl. On his return to Australia Andrew continued to perform regularly with the cream of Australias Jazz musicians as well as a great many visiting overseas Jazz artists. Andrew also has a busy schedule of overseas performances. His recent performance include New York, Europe, Brazil, Laos and Singapore. He has led various incarnations of his own ensemble and is currently forming and shaping his latest, exciting band of talented young musicians. As well as his performing schedule Andrew has a passionate interest in music education - focusing on Jazz. He is the lecturer in Jazz Drums at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music. His list of former and current students comprises the majority of the young, happening drummers on the Sydney scene. He is also involved in school and private tuition, clinics and workshops and as a visiting "artist in residence" for various institutions. Andrew has continued his own personal studies. His current teacher - really more of a coach or even "guru" is the amazing Michael Carvin. He has also studied recently with Bernard Purdie and Brazillian master Vanderlai Pereira. Andrew is proud to endorse and perform exclusively on Canopus Drums - from Tokyo, Japan.

Andrew has performed, toured and recorded with the following artists:

Trumpet

Bobby Shew, Eddie Henderson, Brian Lynch, Valery Ponamarev, Bob Montgomery, Leroy Jones, Jon Erik Kelso, Warren Vache

Trombone

Bruce Paulson, Dan Barrett, Al Herman, Wycliffe Gordon

Saxophone

Johnny Griffin, Lee Konitz, Richie Cole, Red Holloway, Branford Marsalis, Ronnie Scott, Vincent Herring, Junior Cook, Justin Robinson, Willie Williams, Ned Goold, Jerry Weldon, Scott Robinson, Charles McPherson, Dave Schumaker

Piano

Ronnie Matthews, Kirk Lightsey, Mickey Tucker, Stephen Scott, Peggy Stern, Norman Simmons, Jim McNeely

Bass

David Williams, John Clayton, Eugene "The Senator" Wright, Peter Ind, Pat O'Leary

Vocalists

Mark Murphy, Annie Ross, Barbara Morrison, Vanessa Rubin, Giacamo Gates, Dee Daniels, Claire Martin, Andy Bey, Lea DeLaria

Guitar

Martin Taylor, Howard Alden, Sheryl Bailey, Bruce Forman

Hammond Organ

Michel Benebig, Tony Monaco, Pat Bianchi

Worked with almost all leading Australian Jazz musicians in a variety of combinations including -

Tom Bakers Swing Orchestra, Tom Bakers Chicago Seven, Dale Barlow Band, Gordon Brisker, Errol Buddle Quartet, Don Burrows Band, Brad Child Orchestra, Sandy Evans Clarion Fracture Zone, Roger Framptons Intersection, Bobby Gebert Trio - Winner MO award Best Jazz Group, Renee Geyer, Bernie McGann Band, James Morrison Band, Mike Nock Quartet, Don Rader Quintet, Andrew Speights - Nows the Time, Monica Trapaga, George Washingmachine, John Harkins Trio, Dan Barnett Big Band, Steve McKenna Trio, Darren Heinrich Organ Trio